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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
cronkite. he was the most trusted man in america. he was the anchor for everybody i was voted down -- for everybody. i was voted down unanimously. they said it would look bad if he turns it down. so let's go to a more mainstream politician which we did. >> wanted to take walter cronkite would take the job? >> i knew that he was very much opposed to the vietnam war. six months before that, he had come back from vietnam and immediately called me and asked to see robert kennedy. the two of them thamet. he said that the senator had to run for president and he went on to say how they could not be one. -- that it could not be one. they would not like us less. kennedy said to him that he would run for president if you would run for the senate in new york. cronkite laughed and said that he could not because he did not live in new york, he lived in connecticut. secondly, he said he was not a democrat, he was registered as an independent. i knew he had those feelings about the war and he would take it seriously. he certainly couldn't out vote anyone else like to think of. >> that was 1968. >
presidentle candidate and my choice was walter cronkite. anchor for everybody. trusted man in america. and i was voted down unanimously. everybody said, don't be silly. he'll never accept. we'll look bad when he turns it down so. let's go to a more mainstream politician, which we did. >> why did you think walter cronkite would even take the job? >> well i knew he was very much apposed to the vietnam war because about six months before that, he had come back from vietnam and immediately called me and asked to see senator robert kennedy, and two of them met. i with us there and he began by saying senator you have to run for president because this wore has got to end and went on to say how unwinning it was. said we would win a village in the daytime and have to give it back at the night. vietnamese in the south may not like the north, but they like us less. i knew and kennedy said to him, well then i'll run for president if you run for the senate in new york and cronkite laughed and said i can't. we're closing the first place, i don't live in new york. i live in connecticut and i'm not a demo
paper on the history of riots in america. my community had been torn up by riots in the aftermath of the killing of dr. martin luther king. she said fine, write about riots in america. for the first time in my life, i actually got turned on by english. i researched riots from the 1920's, overseas, and spent hours in the library. i came back and wrote a 140 page manuscript, as i recall. mrs. klinger took this manuscript home. she was a diminutive whiteshe took it home and came back after the weekend and calls me up and says ellis, i will tell you what. i will give you an "a" in this course. i am really not capable of judging this material. you need to send this to a professional. i paused and said, a professional what? i dunno and professionals. -- i do not know any professionals. >> she said, have you ever heard a woman called gwendolyn brooks? send it to her. see what she thinks. we got an address where she was teaching, and i sent gwendolyn brooks this manuscript on riots throughout history. i did not hear anything for weeks, and one saturday i got a call. it was gwendolyn brook
, about 50 pages. i read them, and at the time at rutgers, i'd teach a class called "murder in america." when i saw that he had been murdered, the intrigue of it was that his three doctors were three of the best physicians and the united states and they really messed up the investigation and the autopsy. knowing how hot forensics this, i thought this would be really interesting to apply this to an old murder case and then to probe the other areas of the case that were so surprising. >> did you decide right there on the spot to do that? >> i did. i told my wife that it hit me in the head. she said that that was a great idea and i should pursue that. >> how long did it take them to buy your book? >> i think a couple of months and then it took nearly a year to write it. >> how did you go about writing it? >> very carefully. i went down to williamsburg to the college of william and mary to the rockefeller library and i went to the state library of virginia in richmond and the richmond historical association. then, the rutgers library and a couple of other places. i did a lot of medical res
being up for grabs. in case of america, a social transition as the country becomes more and more of a minority dominated country which is causing some interesting fissions. obviously, we are in transition around the world of american foreign policy tries to redefine itself in the middle east once again and tries to remake itself. >> how long have you been writing your 1500 word column? >> that is a good question. i am guessing about 10 years. maybe even longer i am terrible about dates. >> 1999, i guess that works out to 10 years. you have been in politics for 15 years? >> wright, i have been in the op ed and page of the times since 1994. >> not many people write one column week. how your project? -- how do you approach it? >> it is completely different from doing the twice a week column that is twice that size. it has got to sustain itself as an essay to hold people and i would say that the biggest thing about how i approach it is to construct it as a narrative. even before having an argument for one thing or another, i like to tell a story. it may come out of my theater backgro
called t murder n america. when i saw that part of the case and the intrigue of it is that his three doctors are called the dream team. they are the best physicians in the united states. they really messed up the investigation and the autopsy. knowing how hot forensics is today, i thought it would be really interesting to apply for an six investigation into an old mortar case -- to an old murder case. >> did you decide right there on the spot to do that? >> i when toent home and told my wife this book fellow at the sky. so i did it right then. >> how long did it take for them to buy your book? >> i think a couple of months. about another year to write it all together. >> how did you go about writing it? to go very carefully. i went to the state library of the virginia in richmond. and richmond historical association. then the record library, firestone library at princeton and a couple of other places to get material. i did a lot of medical research in this one. i was really surprised -- i think everyone realize that madison was quite primitive, yet in autopsies it was pretty advanced
funds. -- federal funds. >> how is c-span funded? 30 years ago america's cable companies created c-span as a public service, a private business initiative. no private mandate, no government money. >> this week on q&a, our guest is frank rich. >> for those who do not read your column on sundays in "the new york times" give us an overview. >> icing we live in a world of the enormous transition, not just transition from one kind of presidential administration to a very different one, but obviously one in economic transition with a lot of the unquestioned rules of our economy being up for grabs. also, in the case of america, a social transition is -- as the party -- country becomes more of another minority dominated party. >> how long have you been writing your column? >> that is a good question. i am guessing about 10 years. maybe even longer. i am terrible about dates. >> 1999. i guess that is about 10 years. you have been in politics for about 10 years? >> i have been in politics since early 1994. >> not many people write one column zero weeks. have you approached this? >> it is com
&a" with our guest, t.r. reid, formerly of "the washington post," and the author of "the healing of america." up next, live, in your calls and comments on today's "washington journal." at 10:00 eastern, the secretary- general of the afl-cio on the future of the labor movement. >> as the debate over health care continues, c-span's health care hub is a key resource. go online, follow the latest tweets and advertisements and links. share your thoughts on the issue with citizen video, including video from town halls to of gone to. there is more at c-span.org /healthcare. >> this morning, democrat congressman gerald connolly of the virginia talks about a town hall meetings and how the issue is playing out at those meetings. we will talk to james cole and doctor john garrett about the health care system, and provide a context to the health-care debate that is currently before congress. in a couple of hours, paul rainwater, executive director of
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)